Tag Archives: First Aid

First Aid Preps

This week I decided to talk about first aid kits. I go into some detail as far as kits that I have built and recommend. I talk about having a personal basic kit with you at all times, having a trauma kit, and also what you should have at home. I talk about some of the books I recommend having in your preparedness library and where I have received motivation to build the kits I have. I talk differences between buying the store bought factory kits and building you own custom kits. Also the importance of knowing how to use the components before actually using them. Please feel free to jump into the comments of this episode with any tips, suggestions, or concerns to what I say this week.

One of our listeners also emailed us to mention with our last episode on getting the family involved to be sure to highlight the importance of preparedness to your family with the examples of what happened to people after hurricanes Sandy and Katrina and how being prepared would have mad a difference.

Thank you for listening to another episode of American Patriot podcast. Remember you can find and subscribe to us on any of the following: iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or Blubrry. You can also subscribe to our channel on YouTube for podcasts and other videos. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. You can also follow Charlie01 directly on Facebook. Thank you also to all the patriot, prepper, and liberty pages, groups, and networks that also share these podcasts and to get your link listed on our site as one of our supporters; please email us.

If you have a question, comment, suggestion, or complaint about something I covered in this or another episode, please email me. I love to hear from you guys no matter what it is about. Please email me at podcast@apiiination.com. If you want your name to be used on the air in a question and answer show, please tell me otherwise I will assume that you want to stay anonymous. For those people that would like to schedule to be interviewed on an episode, please click here or the link at the top of this page

For those that would like to help support this podcast, please click on and shop through some of our affiliate links featured on the website. Shopping at AmericanFlags.com, The Tuttle Twins, Conflicted Card Game, or Amazon from any of the banners on this website will give us a small percentage of commission on your purchase without costing you anything extra. Any purchases made at our web store at APIIIshop.APIIINation.com will also help us keep the lights on.

The current opening song is Join Or Die, by 1916

The current closing song is the Star Spangled Banner, performed by the Air Force Marching Band

**Disclaimers**

All precious metal prices (gold and silver) are obtained from JM Bullion prior to the publishing of this podcast. All crypto currency market prices (BTC, BTH, ETH, and LTC) are obtained from Coinbase prior to the publishing of this podcast. Any medical advice or information discussed on this podcast are not provided by a medically licensed professional and should only be done at your own risk and should be discussed with your medical provider before practiced. For additional herbalist information, please feel free to join the One Herb A Day mailing list for free.

Prep For Your Pets

Happy 100th episode of our podcast. Thank you to all of you that made this possible by listening, sharing, and contributing to the success of this show. It may have been rough at times and we have changed show format and content quite a few times. We have had months of uncertainty on the future of it, but we have weathered the storm and are continuing to bring you content. I would love to especially thank those that allow us to post episodes on their various platforms of social media, please check them out at our supporters page. I would also like to thank those that over the years came on the show for various interviews and comments.

Ok so today I talk about pet prep since it has been a while. I talk about the roles that your two or four legged friends may play in a survival situation. I focus mostly on dogs and cats though even though there are many other pets out there that may be beneficial in their own ways. I talk food and water storage. First aid for your four-legged companions and the importance of having a good first aid reference book like The First Aid Companion for Dogs & Cats. After that I talk of some other items you really should keep as well. I hope you all enjoy the episode.

Thank you for listening to another episode of American Patriot podcast. Remember you can find and subscribe to us on any of the following: iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or Blubrry. You can also subscribe to our channel on YouTube for podcasts and other videos. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. You can also follow Charlie01 directly on Facebook. Thank you also to all the patriot, prepper, and liberty pages, groups, and networks that also share these podcasts and to get your link listed on our site as one of our supporters; please email us.

If you have a question, comment, suggestion, or complaint about something I covered in this or another episode, please email me. I love to hear from you guys no matter what it is about. Please email me at podcast@apiiination.com. If you want your name to be used on the air in a question and answer show, please tell me otherwise I will assume that you want to stay anonymous. For those people that would like to schedule to be interviewed on an episode, please click here or the link at the top of this page

For those that would like to help support this podcast, please click on and shop through some of our affiliate links featured on the website. Shopping at AmericanFlags.com, The Tuttle Twins, Conflicted Card Game, or Amazon from any of the banners on this website will give us a small percentage of commission on your purchase without costing you anything extra. Any purchases made at our web store at APIIIshop.APIIINation.com will also help us keep the lights on.

The current opening song is Join Or Die, by 1916

The current closing song is the Star Spangled Banner, performed by the Air Force Marching Band

**Disclaimers**

All precious metal prices (gold and silver) are obtained from JM Bullion prior to the publishing of this podcast. All crypto currency market prices (BTC, BTH, ETH, and LTC) are obtained from Coinbase prior to the publishing of this podcast. Any medical advice or information discussed on this podcast are not provided by a medically licensed professional and should only be done at your own risk and should be discussed with your medical provider before practiced. For additional herbalist information, please feel free to join the One Herb A Day mailing list for free.

Every Day Carry Essentials


Everyone has an everyday carry (EDC) kit whether they know it or not; if they carry the same items every day, they have an EDC kit. Preppers take extra care in selecting the items in their kit usually adding tools that will help them with any aspect of life they may find themselves in. Some preppers and patriots however put more stock in certain items more than others and not always the correct one. A month ago American Patriot the III% ran a contest in one of the Facebook groups and wanted to know contestants most important EDC item, everyone started flashing their gun. Now as important as personal protection is, our carry pistol is the least used tool (thankfully) in our EDC kits. So what is the most used items that people use every day?


1. Cell Phone
Most everyone has a cell phone now a days and the majority of them are smart phones. We use our phones for the obvious phone calls and text, but there are several other functions smart phones do. The smart phone has successfully replaced dozens of products that people use in their everyday life which, whether you like it or not, makes your phone immensely important to survival. Here is a short list of tools that an average phone can do today without having wireless service or even wifi: road or topographical maps, camera, voice recorder, camcorder, notebook, library of books, scientific calculator, watch, timer, datebook, MP3 player, and many more. With some type of service you can add two-way radio, police scanner, weather station, up-to-date news, GPS, and then the obvious communications. In my opinion, the ability to have maps and reference books at my finger tips with or without wireless service is enough for me to always have my phone on me. There is one massive down side: durability. Smart phones are very fragile just like a basic lap-top computer, so you should protect them with the best phone case you can get. LifeProof makes a very durable waterproof/shockproof case for most models of phones and even though they aren’t waterproof, the Otterbox Defender series is shockproof and I personally have seen how well it works.


2. Knife
I use my knife or knives all the time and not just for cutting. Now even though the manufacturers will never recommend using your knife for anything more than the intended purpose of cutting, how many other people have used theirs for prying, scraping, sawing, or even as a screwdriver (even though it didn’t have a drive bit or was a swiss army design). It is due to those extra curricular “activities” that when I am selecting a new knife, I look for the most durable at a reasonable price. I currently still carry my Camillus EDC3 that I reviewed last year. I also carry a Wenger Basic Issue that unfortunately is no longer available, however the Victorinox Swiss Army PioneerEdit looks to be identical and slightly cheaper.


3. Flashlight
Now many people may not see the need for a flashlight every day, but neither did I until I started carrying one. My background profession is nothing cool that may require a flashlight, I’m not a security guard, law enforcement, mechanic, or any career that may operate in dark places; I am in retail management. Before my flashlight days, I’d just deal with low light environments with eye squinting and feeling around for objects hidden in the shadows of backrooms or under desks. With a flashlight I can actually see product names printed on the ends of heavy boxes that are shadowed by pallet shelving or that pesky quarter that rolled under the desk in the cash office. You don’t have to be a creature of the dark to need a good flashlight. Some may be saying that their phone works as a light and that may work for you, but for those of you that work someplace that may result in unintended damage to your handheld computer, get a flashlight. Flashlights come in all shapes and sizes so you should find one that meets your needs and is still small enough to carry without it being cumbersome. I have two that I walk around with all the time, one is the Streamlight NanoEdit which was my second light that I carried in my EDC. The nano was much, much smaller than my original light and that was the reason I bought it. After using it for about a month I realized the limitations and began searching for a new one and that is when I was introduced to my current light the Lux Pro LP290. It is a little larger than some models on the market and it is perfect for my main, but I still carry my nano because it’s small enough to clip on to my swiss army knife.

4. First Aid Kit
You don’t have to carry a full first aid kit on you all day, but anything from a a few band-aids to a pocket trauma kit. I personally only carry band-aids, antiseptic wipes, aspirin, and ibuprofen. You can get and carry a pocket trauma kit like the D.A.R.K. by Dark Angel Medical, but they can get expensive and not all people can fit it in to their kit. I also don’t recommend using medical equipment that you have not received proper training with.

5. Cash
Yes, I said cash. Relying on electronic payment or funds may be easy, but can be quite problematic. Ignoring all the recent collapsing economies, it’s just smart to have cash on hand with power outages or other instances of electronic card readers failing. How much money to keep on hand is up for debate, but i suggest at least $50 up to $200. For those concerned with safety and security while carrying cash, it is another reason to carry a defensive pistol or carry the bulk of the money in a safe place on your person and keep an decoy wallet.

Ultimately what you have in an EDC kit has to fit your personal and professional lifestyle. Look at what you do every day and decide what items work best for you. Please tell us what you have in your EDC.

Please send any questions or comments to podcast@APIIINation.com

For information on getting involved please visit our resources page on APIIINation.com or email info@APIIINation.com. Find us on WTPRevolution.com or on Twitter @AP3Nation

You can also join our forum

Immunity

Special thanks to Joe Alton, M.D. (Dr. Bones) and Amy Alton, A.R.N.P. (Nurse Amy) at DoomandBloom.net

smallpox3

I’ve been writing a lot about epidemics lately, including Ebola, EnterovirusD68, and others. I talk about immunity issues a lot in my articles, but I haven’t really explained what it is in much detail. In this article, I hope to give you a working knowledge of it and the various types of immunity that keep a community from running rampant with infectious disease.

Your immune system is a marvel, and probably saves your life every day from one harmful germ or another, and even zaps some microscopic cancers.

Let’s talk a bit about immunity as it relates to infectious disease. Immunity is the ability of your immune system to resist a particular infection or toxin. This can refer to resistance of an entire species (humans, for example, don’t get very many diseases that fish get) or the resistance of a particular individual to an illness. Typhoid Mary, for instance, was a domestic cook who carried the germ for Typhoid fever and passed it on to many others without ever getting sick herself. Immunity is affected by many factors, such as age, genetics, and stress from nutritional, environmental, or chronic illness, something we’ll all experience in a survival setting.

There are several levels of immunity. They are:

  1. SHORT-TERM IMMUNITY

When an infectious agent is detected, the body responds by producing a large amount of white blood cells, an immune response which attacks the invader. Your body does this for every day. During an epidemic, the human population’s ability to generate white cells increases its resistance. It is this property of the human body that causes the epidemic to eventually collapse.

  1. LONG-TERM IMMUNITY

The body’s defenses may retain a type of ‘memory’ of the offending organism. If the illness returns to the area, that memory causes the body to produce a faster and stronger response against it. This is especially true with viral infections, often giving lifetime protection. An example would be “Varicella”, a viral illness otherwise known as ‘chicken pox”. Once you have had chicken pox, you probably won’t get it again for the remainder of your life.

  1. NATURAL IMMUNITY

A particular individual, or occasionally an entire species, might possess the ability to resist a pathogen due to genetic “memory” passed on from generation to generation.

The Native American population of the New World, for example, had an extraordinarily high mortality rate when exposed to smallpox by the first European explorers. In some areas, 90% of the native population of the North American East Coast died. Those same explorers, however, had a much higher survival rate due to natural immunity given by centuries of previous exposures.

4. HERD IMMUNITY

When a large group (a “herd”) possesses immunity, non-immune individuals in it enjoy a certain protection due to fewer exposures to an infection that may otherwise be fatal to them. The most common example today relates to vaccinated populations. If an unvaccinated person moves into an area where many are immune due to vaccinations, the likelihood of exposure to, say, measles drops significantly. This confers a certain level of protection. The person isn’t immune to measles but there is very little exposure to it because everyone else is vaccinated. if many unvaccinated people move into an area, however, the overall “herd immunity” may be lost.

immunization

5. ACQUIRED IMMUNITY

Vaccinations against influenza are usually made available to people in developed countries in advance of seasonal outbreaks, in an effort to confer immunity to the populace. This type of immunity is known as acquired immunity, as it was acquired artificially by vaccine as opposed to natural immunity by exposure to a disease.

With influenza, these are most effective if the virus is similar to last year’s strain, as they use material from that to produce the vaccine. If the virus has mutated significantly, the vaccine may not be as effective. If the virus doesn’t mutate a great deal, such as smallpox, vaccine could eradicate a disease. This is not to say that there might not be side-effects or complications from the vaccine, just that the benefits might outweigh the risk in certain cases.

That’s just a little on immunity. in future articles, we’ll discuss important aspects of protection against those bugs that might cross the border into your area and some topics from our latest no-nonsense DVD on pandemic preparedness.

Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones

Special Announcement: With Ebola, Enterovirus D68, and other infectious diseases running rampant,we’ve put together what we think is a comprehensive DVD on everything you need to know and do to avoid becoming a victim of the next great pandemic. In our DVD PANDEMIC PREPAREDNESS, we teach you all about:

• Epidemic, Pandemic, And Endemic Diseases

• Basics Of Immunity

• Bacteria, Viruses, Parasitic Protozoa As Causes Of Disease

• The History Of Pandemics Through Time

• Modern Day Candidates For Pandemic Disease

• How Pandemics Spread

• Pandemic Prevention

• How To Put Together An Effective Survival Sick Room

• Pandemic Supplies

• Personal Protection Gear And How To Safely Put Them On And Take Them Off

• Antibiotics And Antivirals

• Influenza, Plague, Smallpox, Ebola, Leprosy, Tuberculosis, Malaria, Cholera, And More

• Biological Warfare

Be the first to get our latest dvd!